PTSD Conference – kNOw MORE

 

November 16, 2019
Carterville, IL | John A. Logan College  |  Main Building, First Floor, F wing
9 AM to 4:30 PM

20 veterans die by suicide – EVERY DAY. Studies have documented the association between post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and veteran suicide.

The good news is that PTSD treatment works. The bad news is that many veterans do not seek or receive the treatment they need. One reason for this is the silence that surrounds PTSD. The silence is killing our veterans, and others, with PTSD. Through education, dialog and understanding, we can shatter the silence.

This conference is your opportunity to learn, engage and help by reducing the stigma associated with PTSD. Become familiar with what PTSD is, what it is not, how it affects lives, the resources and tools available, and how they can and do create real and positive change.

Topics include:

  • PTSD: What It Is (& What It Is Not)     
  • Talk Saves Lives
  • Lifespan Consequences of ACES, Toxic Stress and Trauma Informed Care
  • Military Cultural Competence for Service Providers and Community Allies
  • When Is a Service Dog Appropriate to Help with PTSD?
  • Service Dogs in Medical Settings
  • Secondary Trauma

Speakers include:

Ginger Meyer, MSW, LCSW, CCTP, SIU School of Medicine; John Mundt, Licensed Clinical Psychologist; Beth Morrison, Director of Wellness Center, SIU Carbondale; Behesha Doan, Founder and Training Director, This Able Veteran; Meg Hawkins, Director and Co-Founder, Making Everything Good; Leslie Horton, RN, Associate Training Director, TAV East; Martin Parsons, MSG, USMC (Ret.) veteran graduates; more TBA.

5.75 CEU’s AND CNE’S available for Social Workers; Professional/Clinical Counselors; Clinical Psychologists; Nurses; Nursing Home Administrators.  A fee of $15 will be charged for those desiring credits. The fee will cover the entire 6 hour conference. No partial refunds are available for those who desire credits but only attend the morning or afternoon sessions.

Register now

This informative day will feature a resource room with materials from service providers and a wide variety of presenters, discussion groups and panels throughout the day including breakout session topics. More information will be added as it becomes scheduled.

TimePresentationPresenterLearning ObjectivesBiography of presenter
9 amWelcome
9:15 amOverview of What PTSD is (And What it is Not)John Mundt, Licensed Clinical PsychologistParticipants will learn the typical presentation of PTSD, including the four symptom clusters.

Participants will learn to identify two potential psychological consequences of trauma that are not part of the PTSD diagnostic criteria.
Mundt is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and a professional speaker and trainer whose clinical experience includes work with clients of all ages and from across the diagnostic spectrum. His primary professional focus is on veterans’ mental health issues, particularly the range of problems impacting the returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan. Mundt has been a Staff Psychologist providing both long-term and time-limited psychotherapy, as well as psychological assessment and case management for veterans. Since 1996, Dr. Mundt has been the psychologist in the Medical Center’s acute-care partial hospitalization program, with a focus on the stabilization and brief treatment of traumatic reactions stemming from combat, sexual assault and inner-city violence as well as other types of trauma. His approach to treatment in this setting emphasizes intensive psycho-education as well as aggressive case management and community advocacy for veterans in the program. He has testified in numerous civil and criminal cases where psychological trauma is a factor. Mundt is a nationally known speaker and trainer who has presented in more than 60 cities on mental health issues germane to veterans as well as other groups.
10:15 amBreak
10:30 amTalk Saves LivesBeth Morrison, Director of Wellness Center, SIU CarbondaleSuicide gatekeeper training through the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

Participants will explore the warning signs and risk factors for suicide.

Participants will be able to identify mental health resources available for veterans.

Participants will learn how to start a conversation with veterans about mental health.
Morrison is the Director of Wellness and Health Promotion Services at Southern Illinois University. She developed “Salukis on Your Side” the campus suicide prevention program funded through the Garrett Lee Smith grant. Beth is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor with over 15 years of experience working in community mental health. She is a volunteer with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and is passionate about increasing and improving suicide prevention efforts with veterans.
11:30 amLunch and Resource Room
12:15 pmBreakout Sessions
When is a Service Dog Appropriate to Help With PTSDBehesha Doan, Founder and Training Director, This Able Veteran

Ginger Meyer, MSW, LCSW, CCTP and project director, Trauma Based Behavioral Health Fellowships, SIU School of Medicine
Participants will learn how service dogs can be used effectively as a therapeutic tool for traumatic stress.

Participants will understand the difference between service dogs that are trained to assist veterans (and others) with PTSD and service dogs that are trained for functions such as “blocking” and “safety checks” and the impacts each method can have on PTSD treatment.
Participants will explore what factors to take into consideration when assessing whether a service dog could be beneficial for someone with PTSD and when it would not.

Participants will understand the role of medical providers in maximizing the effectiveness of work with a service dog.
Doan is the owner of Extreme K-9, a professional dog training business focused on training both working dogs and pets, and rehabilitating problem behaviors. Through This Able Veteran, Doan has developed a veteran-centric model of care that involves the veterans, their clinicians, the service dogs and This Able Veteran. This unique model for trauma recovery not only trains dogs but also integrates them into a team of two with their veteran. Doan is a gifted public speaker, lecturer and published author on the subject of canine behavior, communication and training. She holds certification as a life coach, with a specialization in trauma resiliency. She is a contributing author to “PTSD Service Dog Best Practices” a professional paper for Assistance Dogs International.

Meyer is the Clinical Director for Children’s Medical and Mental Health Resource Network. Working with child welfare issues for over twenty years, she is a leader in the Southern Illinois community developing professionals in trauma informed practices.

Meyer serves as the Project Director/lead trainer of the Trauma Based Behavioral Health Fellowship, training over one hundred advanced degree students in evidence-based trauma treatment. She is a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional and a member of the International Association of Trauma Professionals. She is a forensic interviewer, a Nationally Certified TF CBT clinician and has a small private practice treating children.
Secondary TraumaMeg Hawkins, President, Silent Warrior, LLC, Director and Co-Founder, Making Everything Good (nonprofit to assist and support the needs of individuals, families and organizations associated with public safety, military, veterans, and the local community)

Matt Buckman, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist, Stress & Trauma Treatment Center, Co-PI & Clinical Director, Trauma Based Behavioral Health Fellowship, SIU School of Medicine
Participants will learn about what Secondary Traumatic Stress is, how it can impact those in the veteran community, and what resources are available to help those who experience it.Hawkins is the proud wife of a combat veteran who lives with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). She is currently a police officer with 15 years of law enforcement experience. In January 2017, she almost lost her husband, Eric, to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and suicide. That experience and struggle rocked their worlds and change their life’s mission. They now share their stories to help others know that “it’s ok to not be ok” and seeking help is not a weakness but a strength.

Although she has lived with anxiety and depression since her late teenage years, her symptoms severely worsened earlier this year. She was diagnosed with moderate PTSD from the traumatic night when her husband went missing and was suicidal. She has completed Prolonged Exposure (PE) and is currently in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) to help with her mental health.

Many times, the wellbeing of spouses or significant others of veterans and first responders are forgotten about. Their mental health cannot be forgotten or overlooked. We battle alongside our partners and are extremely affected by their mental health. We are the Silent Warriors.
In 2018, Meg, along with her husband Eric Provow, founded the nonprofit organization Making Everything Good (M.E.G.) to assist and support the needs of individuals, families, and organizations associated with public safety, military, veterans, and their local community.

Buckman is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist in private practice. He also serves in various part-time leadership and consultative roles. Dr. Buckman is the Co-PI and Clinical Director for several programs and projects including the Trauma-Based Behavioral Health Fellowship and Trauma Responsive Schools initiative at the Center for Rural Health & Social Services Development within SIU’s School of Medicine, the Southern Illinois Violence Prevention Project at the Illinois Association of Juvenile Justice Councils, and the Stress & Trauma Treatment Center. Dr. Buckman also serves as a consultant for the Trauma Informed System of Care Project led by Centerstone, Project Connect System of Care led by Egyptian Health Department and is the co-chair of Resilient Southern Illinois within 17 school districts, the Consortium for Resilient Young Children within the Southern Illinois Coalition for Children and Families, the Early Childhood Mental Health Initiative, and the Rural Behavioral Health Learning Community for the TA Network for SAMHSA.
1:15 pmBreak
1:30 pmMoral Injury John Mundt, Licensed Clinical PsychologistParticipants will understand the concept of “moral injury”, and how it occurs in war veterans.

Participants will learn how moral injury may impact the clinical presentation in traumatized combat veterans.

Participants will understand the relationship between moral injury and veteran suicide.
Mundt is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and a professional speaker and trainer whose clinical experience includes work with clients of all ages and from across the diagnostic spectrum. His primary professional focus is on veterans’ mental health issues, particularly the range of problems impacting the returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan. Mundt has been a Staff Psychologist providing both long-term and time-limited psychotherapy, as well as psychological assessment and case management for veterans. Since 1996, Dr. Mundt has been the psychologist in the Medical Center’s acute-care partial hospitalization program, with a focus on the stabilization and brief treatment of traumatic reactions stemming from combat, sexual assault and inner-city violence as well as other types of trauma. His approach to treatment in this setting emphasizes intensive psycho-education as well as aggressive case management and community advocacy for veterans in the program. He has testified in numerous civil and criminal cases where psychological trauma is a factor. Mundt is a nationally known speaker and trainer who has presented in more than 60 cities on mental health issues germane to veterans as well as other groups.
Service dogs in medical settingsLeslie Horton, RN, Associate Training Director, TAV East Chapter Participants will learn to verbalize the difference between service dogs, ESAs, and therapy animals.

Participants will learn to demonstrate proper service animal etiquette.

Participants will learn to define the term zoonoses and be able to decrease risks of zoonoses by knowing how to distinguish differences for access and determine safety of those animals accessing the healthcare environment.

Participants will learn to understand and communicate access laws for Service Dogs under the DOJ Title III of the ADA and per the EOC, including the ability to verbalize the two questions that can be asked under Title III.

Participants will learn how to proceed if the animal is creating a disruption in services.
Horton is the founder and owner of Most Fine Canine Inc. and has been training dogs and their handlers since March 2000. She is Pet Partner Team Member with four dogs, and is a Pet Partner Team Instructor and Evaluator. She holds certifications as a Certified Dog Trainer, Certified Dog Trainer Advanced, Professional Dog Trainer Instructor, and Certified Service Dog Trainer. She is the associate training director for This Able Veteran East.

Horton is a final placement trainer for service dogs for children and adults with neurological and mobility disabilities, including, but not limited to, multiple sclerosis, degenerative arthritis, autism, deafness, spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injuries. She is a member of the International Association of Canine Professionals (IACP) and received the 2014 IACP Member of the Year Award and was inducted into the IACP Hall of Fame in 2015.

Horton started the Animal Assisted Care (AAC) Program on the Inova Fairfax Medical Center campus in 2001. The campus includes four acute care hospitals and has an 800-bed capacity. As the coordinator of the AAC Program, Leslie oversees the handler/canine teams and built an animal assisted care program that is internationally recognized as a leader in animal-assisted therapy. She and her first canine Pet Partner, Chug, were recipients of the Delta Society 2005 Beyond Limits Award for Outstanding AAT Professionals.

Horton was a member of the U.S. Department of Transportation Regulation/Negotiation Workgroup looking as service dogs and ESAs on airlines and the Airline Access Carriers Act. She has been a speaker at multiple conferences regarding the laws and training of service dogs.

Horton is a registered nurse with over 30 years of experience in critical care nursing and holds current certification in adult critical care nursing.
2:30Break
2:45 pmMilitary Cultural Competence for Service Providers and Community AlliesMartin Parsons, MSG, USMC (Ret.), director, Veterans’ Legal Assistance Program, SIU School of Law

Paul Copeland, Lt. Col., USAF (Ret.), Coordinator of Veterans’ Services for SIU Carbondale
Participants will learn basic information about military branches, ranks, terms, and acronyms.
Participants will increase their awareness of challenges faced by veterans, service members, and their families, and learn how to serve and support them.

Participants will learn about veteran and service member attitudes toward mental health treatment that can create obstacles to successful outreach and treatment.
Parsons is the director and adjunct professor at SIU School of Law’s Veterans’ Legal Assistance Program (“VLAP”). The VLAP assists veterans in VA disability claims appeals, petitions for discharge upgrades in limited circumstances, and provides assistance with some civil legal matters. The VLAP is a partner in the Illinois Armed Forces Legal Aid Network.

Parsons retired from the military after spending four years on active duty in the Marine Corps and twenty-two years, part-time and full-time, in the Illinois Army National Guard. While in the National Guard, Martin served in Iraq from 2005 – 2006 with the 2-130th Infantry Battalion in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. After retiring from the military, Martin decided to attend law school and graduated from SIU School of Law in May of 2015.

Parsons is licensed to practice law in Illinois and Missouri. Admitted to practice in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois and the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims. Accredited Attorney for claims for veteran’s benefits before the Department of Veterans Affairs. Chair of ISBA Standing Committee on Military Affairs 2019-2020.

Copeland was born in Frankfort Germany to two U.S. Army veterans in April ’61. The family was in Germany due to his father’s assignment with the Armed Forces Courier Service.

A graduate of SIU Carbondale, Copeland earned a commission in the U.S. Air Force through the Reserve Officer Training Corps program and entered active duty in October ‘83. He reported to his first assignment at Francis E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming after completing Inter-continental Ballistic Missile Launch Officer training. Subsequent assignments included: Offutt AFB, Nebraska, two tours at Minot AFB, North Dakota, the Pentagon, Schriever AFB and Peterson AFB, Colorado.

LT. Col. Copeland commanded the 323rd Training Squadron at Lackland AFB, Texas.
He retired from his final assignment with the Defense Threat Reduction Agency at Fort Belvoir, Virginia after 27 years active duty in ‘11. He and his wife, Susan McNally, have two children, Anya and Benjamin and reside in DeSoto, IL.
Copeland serves as Coordinator of Veterans’ Services for SIU Carbondale.
Lifespan Consequences of ACES, Toxic Stress and Trauma Informed CareGinger Meyer, MSW, LCSW, CCTP and project director, Trauma Based Behavioral Health Fellowships, SIU School of MedicineParticipants will gain an understanding of what Adverse Childhood Experiences are and how they can contribute to a client’s way of life and social determinants of health.

Participants will increase their level of understanding of the impact ACES have on mental health and brain development.

Participants will increase their knowledge about Trauma Informed Care and be aware of how all aspect of care need to be trauma informed.
Meyer is the Clinical Director for Children’s Medical and Mental Health Resource Network. Working with child welfare issues for over twenty years, she is a leader in the Southern Illinois community developing professionals in trauma informed practices.

Meyer serves as the Project Director/lead trainer of the Trauma Based Behavioral Health Fellowship, training over one hundred advanced degree students in evidence-based trauma treatment. She is a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional and a member of the International Association of Trauma Professionals.

She is a forensic interviewer, a Nationally Certified TF CBT clinician and has a small private practice treating children.
3:45 pmThis Able Veteran Graduates and Spouses PanelModerator: Pamela Largent, President, This Able Veteran

Eric Provow, President, Denny’s Got My 6, LLC
Co-Founder, Making Everything Good (M.E.G.)

Meg Hawkins, others TBA
Participants will learn about what it is like to live with PTSD as a veteran and as a veteran spouse/significant other.

Participants will learn about the challenges of incorporating a service dog into their home and work lives.
Largent serves as the president of This Able Veteran and has been on the Board of Directors since ‘12. In this capacity, Pam is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the organization as well as leading the efforts for long-term growth and sustainability.

She has been a management consultant for over 25 years, retiring from the U.S. Treasury Department in ‘17. In this capacity, she assisted in reorganizing the tax administration offices in various countries in Africa and the Caribbean. Pam holds a degree in Organization Development from Northeastern Illinois University. She did graduate work at Northeastern and American University. She completed the Organizational Development Program through National Training Laboratories Institute in Bethel, Maine. Pam specializes in organizational design and development, change management and leadership development.

Provow is a retired combat veteran with 20 years of military service split between the Marine Corps and Air Force. As a Marine, he was assigned to Reconnaissance and Force Reconnaissance units. In the Air Force, Eric was a Combat Controller assigned to Air Force Special Operations Command. He then went onto serve with the premier units within the Joint Special Operations Command. During his military career Eric was deployed on numerous contingency operations and did three combat tours to Afghanistan and Iraq. During his second tour to Afghanistan in 2002 Eric was involved in a firefight that left mental scars and left him suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

In 2017, Eric’s struggle with PTSD became too much for him and he became suicidal. With the support of his wife, he began the long road to getting help for the first time. Eric began going through multiple treatment modalities and attending veterans’ programs. After all of this he was still having struggles and in 2018 he was selected to attend This Able Veteran’s trauma program and was paired with his service dog Denny.

A year after Eric’s suicide attempt, Eric and his wife Meg began speaking out about the stigma associated mental health and asking for help among veterans and first responders. They have participated in numerous videos and interviews and actively speak to organizations about their experiences and show others that its “ok to not be ok” and ask for help. Eric Provow is currently a Firefighter/Paramedic in northern Virginia with 12 years of experience. He is also a member of his department’s Technical Rescue Team.

In 2018, Eric, along with his wife, founded the nonprofit organization Making Everything Good (M.E.G.) to assist and support the needs of individuals, families, and organizations associated with public safety, military, veterans, and their local community.
4:30 pmClosing

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